Tag Archives: wine review

On the Twentieth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a SubRosa Chardonnay

Chardonnay rhymes with Tuesday right?

This Chardonnay is an absolute cracker in the lead up to Christmas. It’s a Chardonnay hailing from SubRosa wines in the Grampians – a cool climate region in Victoria, Australia.

Behind this brilliant wine is brilliant winemaker Adam Louder. Adam has many years of experience in the wine industry, having worked in Bordeaux, the Napa Valley, and now in Australia. Adam’s wealth of experience really shows in SubRosa’s wine case, and this Chardonnay is no exception. The grapes are handpicked, and are pressed as a full bunch, which is means less fruit damaged, and tonnes of flavour.

The wine is refreshing, and I feel has a slightly modern take on the classic Chardonnay. With melon and citrus flavours coming through, it has a slight acidity level to it. While some Chardonnay’s are big on that big buttery taste, this one is not so much, and is an absolute delight to drink.  The other big plus is that it comes at a price tag of $25! Everyone’s a winner!

The name of the wine also has a great story behind it:

“SubRosa is latin for under the rose. In ancient times, a rose was hung over the table as a mark of secrecy. What was said or happened around the table, stayed at the table.” http://www.subrosawine.com.au

 

IMG_4011.JPG

Here I’ve paired the SubRosa Chardonnay with a fresh home made pasta topped with Chicken, Mushroom and Asparagus in a white wine sauce

Until next time winos,

Cheers

 

 

 

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , ,

On the Sixteenth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Medhurst Rosé

Yes Tis the season for a Rosé. I’ve now featured a couple of Rosé’s in the advent wine calendar, even a frosé!

It’s on the top of my list as THE Summer wine. It’s a great alternative than just the usual white you may lean towards. It’s even a great wine to take with you when you go sailing! So fancy!

tip the bottle.JPG

Look! I’m on a boat!

This Rosé hails from Medhurst Wines in the Yarra Valley in Victoria. It was even crowned best Rosé at the Yarra Valley Wine Show in 2016!

It’s so deserving of the accolade.

tip the bottle rose.jpg

What a winner!

The wine is made from a blend of Shiraz and Cabernet Sauvignon grapes, and is a beautiful light pink colour. Wondering how Rosé gets its pink colour? see my blog post here!

Melbourne, you are such a tease with your good weather. You make me want to drink Rosé.
It’s crisp and refreshing flavours of strawberry and tarty fruits, like raspberries and citrus, make me feel like I’m eating a dessert, but without the sweetness.

“Deliciously elusive fresh fruits including strawberry and raspberry are supported by white blossom of jasmine and citrus. The 2016 Medhurst Rosé shows bright personality of the Shiraz bringing freshness and liveliness to the wine, and the copper-hue from the Cabernet brings the fine drying finish and amazing persistence of flavour, cleansing the palate ready for another mouthful.” http://www.medhurstwines.com.au

It’s great to have on its own, or with white meat, or even with a cheeky cheese.

Until next time winos

Cheers

 

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

On the fourteenth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Maxwell Wines Lime Stone Cabernet Sauvignon

I came across this wine in a wine review from a fellow wine blogger ‘muchtodoaboutwine
The review really caught my interest, particularly the part about the aroma being similar to that of an open bag of jelly babies. I knew I wanted to try it.

200.gif

Here’s the review:

“Impeneratable purple in the glass with classic notes of blackberry, blackcurrant along with aromas similar to that of a freshly opened bag of natural confection co jelly babies driven secondarily by slight herbaceous notes, a slap of mint, liquorice and some oak which fits right into place. The full bodied palate is similar to that of the nose that is scaffolded by lacy ropes of tannin that’s filled with high fruit intensity. Reckon you’ll be good going for another 6-8 years and turn your world upside down by pairing it with some beautiful roasted lamb” muchtodoaboutwine

Maxwell Wines is located in McLaren Vale in South Australia.
Established in the late 70’s, the winery takes a hands on approach to wine making. Two of its signature wines are the Lime Cave Cabernet, and the Ellen Street Shiraz.

The vineyard sits on a limestone base, which is ideal for reds. Being located in a hot dry climate, it serves the grapes well.

One of the unique points about Maxwell Wines is its cellar. The cellar was built in to the limestone hill, with a barrel room located at the base, surrounded by limestone. This natural and solid structure houses the barrels at a constant temperature, where the wines mature well.

Maxwell wines are ideal for cellaring and ageing.
The 2013 Lime Cave Cabernet Sauvignon

Medium bodied, rich in colour, with a smooth flavour of blackberries, and vanilla, hinted with oak. Makes for a very delightful Wednesday evening!

tip the bottle.png

“The palate is classic Cabernet. Concentrated flavours of cranberry, cherry and cassis taste like the day the grapes were picked, integrated with delicate cedar and vanilla oak. These flavours are elegantly balanced with firm tannins and a persistent mouth filling finish.” www.maxwellwines.com.au

Until next time winos

Cheers

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

On the twelfth day of Christmas my wine rack gave to me a Catena Malbec

Malbec Monday

Malbec is a grape variety that hails from France, and is usually blended in Bordeaux wines. While the grape hails from France, the country that really makes this variety shine is Argentina.
In France, the weather and soil conditions are not ideal for Malbec, and tends to be very prone to disease, which is why the variety is used in many blends. Pop the grape in Argentina, and it thrives – the hot, high altitude climate is perfect for Malbec.

Malbec is quite similar to a Merlot, with its plum like flavours, but with a little more character and depth.

The wine that takes out number 12 in the wine advent calendar is the 2014 Catena Malbec.

FullSizeRender(5).jpg

Deep, and rich in burgandy colour (typical of a Malbec), the Catena has a very fragrant, earthy aroma. It’s smooth and silky, and has distinct oak and pepper notes.

Go on, treat yourself to a Malbec Monday. You deserve it!

Until next time winos

Cheers!

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Wine and Food Match test – Jamie Oliver’s Beef Tagine & a Shiraz

This week I’ve decided to road test a food and wine match suggestion I recently read about.

 

I came across this suggestion through Foxtel’s Lifestyle Food newsletter, featuring their wine expert Angus Hughson. His motto – ‘Life is too short to drink bad wine’. I couldn’t agree more.

Foxtel Lifestyle Food newsletter

The wine suggestion was the 2012 Angove Long Row Shiraz; an elegant spicy Australian Shiraz, described as being medium bodied, peppery, fruity with dark cherry notes.

 

The food suggestion was Jamie Oliver’s Beef Tagine. For those of you who don’t know me, I must let you know I am a massive Jamie Oliver fan, so this match suggestion had intrigued me from the get-go; yep, that’s me with Jamie Oliver.

Me Jamie Oliver

Armed with the wine suggestion and recipe in hand, off I trundled to my local supermarket to source the ingredients. Unfortunately my local wine seller did not stock this particular wine, however, Angus did suggest a Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon or a Grenache as the best wines to pair with Beef Tagine.

Putting my reading glasses on, I scoured the wine racks to find something that would be of similar style to the Angove Long Row Shiraz. What I came out with was a Partisan Trench Coat Vintage 2010 from McLaren Vale – a blend of Grenache, Shiraz and Mourvedre (or commonly known as a GSM wine).

 

Partisan Trench Coat

The label stated the style of the wine to be ‘spicy, complex and brightly fruity’, which I figured aligned well with Angus’ first suggestion of pairing it with an elegant spicy Australian Shiraz – A man in a trench coat is elegant right?

 

 

 

 

 

 

After a long 3 hours waiting for the beef tagine to cook, I could not wait to sink my teeth in to the food and wine.

 

The verdict? Angus you are a star. This was a match made in heaven. The melt in your mouth meat paired perfectly with the spicy and fruity Shiraz – or in my case the GSM.

 

The Partisan was a dream to sip on – peppery on the nose, and spicy on the palate. I could easily drink this wine without the beef, however drinking it with the tagine really did balance out the 100+ spices that went in to the dish.

Jamie oliver beef tagine partisan

If you have a few hours to spare, I highly recommend you to whip up this dish and have your Shiraz on hand to serve up at a dinner party. I can guarantee you will have your friends coming back with their wine glass asking ‘Please sir, I want some more?’

 

Until next time wino’s,

 

Cheers

 

 

Here’s the recipe! Credit to Lifestyle Food channel.

http://www.lifestylefood.com.au/recipes/16634/beef-tagine

Ingredients:

  • 600g stewing beef
  • olive oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • a small bunch of fresh coriander
  • 1 x 400g tin of chickpeas, drained
  • 1 x 400g tin of chopped tomatoes
  • 800ml vegetable stock, preferably organic
  • 1 small squash (approximately 800g), deseeded and cut into 5cm chunks
  • 100g prunes, stoned and roughly torn
  • 2 tablespoons flaked almonds, toasted

For the spice rub

  • sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 level tablespoon ras el hanout spice mix*
  • 1 level tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1 level tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 level tablespoon ground ginger
  • 1 level tablespoon sweet paprika

 

*Ras el hanout (Arabic for ‘top of the shop’) is a blend of the best spices a vendor has in his shop. The mixture varies depending on who is selling it, but can be a combination of anywhere from 10 to 100 spices. It usually includes nutmeg, cinnamon, mace, aniseed, turmeric, cayenne, peppercorns, dried galangal, ginger, cloves, cardamom, chilli, allspice and orris root.

 

Method:

1 Mix all the spice rub ingredients together in a small bowl. Put the beef into a large bowl, massage it with the spice rub, then cover with clingfilm and put into the fridge for a couple of hours – ideally overnight. That way the spices really penetrate and flavour the meat.

 

2. When you’re ready to cook, heat a generous lug of olive oil in a tagine or casserole– type pan and fry the meat over a medium heat for 5 minutes. Add your chopped onion and coriander stalks and fry for another 5 minutes. Tip in the chickpeas and tomatoes, then pour in 400ml of stock and stir. Bring to the boil, then put the lid on the pan or cover with foil and reduce to a simmer for 1½hours.

 

3. At this point add your squash, the prunes and the rest of the stock. Give everything a gentle stir, then pop the lid back on the pan and continue cooking for another 1½hours. Keep an eye on it and add a splash of water if it looks too dry.

 

4. Once the time is up, take the lid off and check the consistency. If it seems a bit too runny, simmer for 5 to 10 minutes more with the lid off. The beef should be really tender and flaking apart now, so have a taste and season with a pinch or two of salt. Scatter the coriander leaves over the tagine along with the toasted almonds, then take it straight to the table with a big bowl of lightly seasoned couscous and dive in.

 

 

 

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A sommelier wine review

When someone recommends a good wine I’m always intrigued to try it; the same goes with a good book or movie.  Recently I was recommended a documentary to watch about wine. While this particular documentary did not feature the sweet narrating sounds of David Attenborough, it did however feature a lot of wine.

 

somm_movie

The documentary is called SOMM.

 

SOMM, short for Sommelier, follows the journey of 4 mates on their quest to gain  ‘Master Sommelier’ status from the Court of Master Sommeliers; the most prestigious status a wine expert can receive in the world of wine.

 

So what is a Sommelier? These are the guys who you would normally see in a fancy restaurant. They’re the ones who can match a wine perfectly with food, and understand cellar rotation and optimum serving temperature of wine. They are also the ones who work with chefs in putting together the wine list for a restaurant. These guys are extremely well educated in wine, and know everything there is to know about wine, and I mean everything – from the grape variety, to country of origin, to the history of wine making and new techniques in the industry.

 

To gain Master Sommelier status, it requires extensive study, exams, training, plenty of wine consuming and, at the end, a final examination from the Court of Master Sommeliers. The course itself can take years, with the final exam being known as one of the toughest exams in the world …and here I was thinking my year 10 maths exam was the toughest in the world.

 

Currently, there are just over 215 Master Sommeliers in the world. With this status only having been around for 40 years, that equates to roughly 5 being awarded each year – yep, I can do math. Once this status is achieved, the doors really do open up for you in terms of job opportunities, career prospects, and bigger salaries.

 

Wine Glasses

SOMM is an amazing insight in to what it takes to become a Master Sommelier. The knowledge these guys have about wine is mind blowing. Their innate ability to pin point every single tasting note of a wine almost makes them sound like ‘Rain Man’.  Not only can they describe a wine perfectly, but they can even pin point the variety, the country of origin, the region it hails from, and get this…even the year of the wine. CRAZZY! With a talent like that, they would be an awesome friend to have around when buying a ‘clean skin’ wine.  Towards the end of the documentary, I was completely drawn in and even found myself cheering on for the four mates to pass their test, just like I would at a footy match – not really, but I was close! So do they pass? You will just have to watch it for yourself to find out.

 

So in the words of Molly Meldrum, do yourself a favour, go out and watch it.

 

 

Until next time winos,

 

Cheers.

 

 
Tagged , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: