How much would you pay for a bottle of wine?

It was announced a couple of weeks ago that Penfolds had released an exclusive range of their Grange wine, complete with a price tag of $3,000.

How much?!

Yep. You read it right. $3,000!

Penfolds have blended three of their best Shiraz vintages, the 2008, the 2012, and the 2014 into one wine called ‘g3’, and there’s only 1,200 bottles of them in the world.

penfolds g3 tip the bottle.jpg

So what makes Penfolds so special and gets people excited like Christmas day?

santa tip the bottle penfolds.gif

Here’s why:

Penfolds winery is one of Australia’s oldest wineries, located in the Barossa Valley in South Australia. Established in 1844, the winery originally produced sherry and fortified wines. After many generations and 100 years later, the winery shifted focus and started to produce ‘table wine’. In the 1950’s Max Schubert, Penfolds chief winemaker at the time, went on a trip to Bordeaux to learn the art of making quality wine. Upon his return, Max ended up producing what we now know today as ‘Grange Hermitage’.

Fact – Hermitage is basically another word for Shiraz or Syrah. The Grange Hermitage is made mostly from Shiraz, with a hint of Cabernet Sauvignon.

max schubert tip the bottle.jpg

Max Schubert the wine master!

Funnily enough, when Max had started producing Grange Hermitage, Penfolds management  and critics slammed it saying that it was rubbish. He was even banished from making it! Despite the knock down, Max continued to make Grange Hermitage in secret. Years later, Penfolds management decided to taste the original wine made back in 1955. After years of it being in storage, it turned out that it was a tasty one and Penfolds went on to reinstate the making of it!  This first vintage went on to win many awards and gold medals. Go Max!

Today, Penfolds Grange Hermitage has gained global recognition and is considered the most premium wine in the world.

What’s the g3 taste like?

With the wine being so unique and rare, the only tasting that occurred was in Hong Kong at the Liang Yi private museum in Sheung Wan. Unfortunately I was unable to make it to  Hong Kong for the tasting, so here’s one review for you to read:

“There’s a depth and density to the rich black fruit that is a hallmark of Grange, with the fruit wrapped up in mature flavours of warm oak and damp earth and sweet leather, as well as youthful characters of dark spice and fine, firm, lingering tannins. In other words, you can see the contribution that each of the three vintages, 2008, 2012 and 2014, brings to the wine, but it all marries together seamlessly.” Max Allen, Australian Financial Review, 19th October 2017

Despite missing out on this g3 tasting opportunity, I will be tasting a Grange Hermitage soon at a Shiraz tasting night at Armadale Cellars in Melbourne, and I cannot wait!

Don’t worry, I’ll be sure to let you in on my opinion of this experience.

 

Until next time wino’s

 

Cheers

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